Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Susan Tedeschi & Derek Trucks Band

This evening, Joan and I attended the Tedeschi Trucks Band concert at the Oncenter's Crouse Hinds Theater.

Michael purchased the tickets for us. Following his directions we effortlessly made our way to OnCenter parking just off Rt. 81. A short two block walk as well as helpful hints from a pleasant lady crossing guard brought us passed the War Memorial and to the front door of the OnCenter.

Ascending to the balcony first by an escalator and then two flights of stairs brought to our seats. There were in the second row from the balcony railing. After a flash of acrophobia passed I settled down next to Joan and prepared to enjoy the opening act, Playonbrother -- the electric soul-rock project featuring Alan Evans of Soulive.

Alan Evans drove the group with his drumming and vocals. The crowd seems pleased with their effort.

The crowd filled in as Playonbrother closed. In front of us, Westcott Kevin and his merry rebel rousers took their seats.  Then proceeded to get up and down for the rest of the evening. It took me awhile to convince myself that none in this group would fall off the balcony.

The concert was well lite and fine tuned. Susan's voice is mellow but she can grit up for the blues. Derek's guitar riffs were riveting while appearing effortless on his part.

The principals allow their sidemen to shone. The horns section was solid. The dueling drummers performed an impressive solo. The backup singers came forward and got the crowd hand clapping.

For the encore Susan set the stage then sat on the side as Derek did a solo.

Exit back to the car and leaving downtown was easy. Only bummer was all the restaurants were closed.

Some photos from our seats:

Preview by Chris Baker.

Review by Chris Baker.

Review by Jeff Spevak.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Week Thirty-Nine - 13 To Go

2014 - Stephen King writes a mystery; James Patterson writes a psychological thriller. These genre switches will keep their readers pushing forward until the last page.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Historic Mentz Church

The Historic Mentz Church is nestled in the rural countryside of the Town of Montezuma, NY. The gable-roofed, one-room church was erected by the early settlers of the area prior to its incorporation in 1825 as a First Methodist Episcopal Church which then was in the Town of Mentz.


The historic roadside marker was generously funded by the William G. Pomeroy Foundation in 2012.

One of the best ways to describe what it meant to the people that attended services at the Old Mentz Church is a poem written by C. Martin Carr.

More interpretations at InSPIREd Sunday.

Week Thirty-Eight - 14 To Go

Nothing new here in this series. Plot tends to be tedious. Might leave the reader with one question - “What happened here?”

Monday, September 8, 2014

Will Rogers Follies, A Life in Revue


This evening Joan and I attended our fourth play of the 2014 season, Will Rogers Follies, A Life in Revue. Once in our seats we observed that the crowd that filled the playhouse was going to be appreciative one.
 Will Rogers (Tom Wopat)
Will Rogers (Tom Wopat) shows off his ropin' skills.
Betty Blake (Elisa Van Duyne)
Mary Rogers (Emma DeGroff), Will Rogers Jr. (Michael Ducayne), James Rogers (Sera Bullis), and Freddy Rogers (Isabella Ducayne)
 Clem Rogers (Steve Luker) and his six single daughters.
The Ensemble
(Photos - Courtesy of Issac James)
The highlights of this production for us were the "Never Met a Man I Didn't Like" done by Tom Wopat and the company as The Finale. Also Steve Luker as Will's father, Clem Rogers, added punch to the humorous segments. Plus the rope tricks by Chris McDaniel (also played the part of Wally Post) were outstanding.

Melinda Johnson's preview in The Post-Standard.
Len Fonte's review in The Post-Standard. 

David Wilcox's preview in The Citizen.

David Wilcox interviews Tom Wopat.

Tom Wopat talks about the 'Dukes of Hazzard'.

David Wilcox's review in The Citizen.

Facts:

Will Rogers dropped out of school in tenth grade to become a cowboy.

The Will Rogers Institute, originally founded as a hospital in 1936, now funds acclaimed research hospitals and nine fellowships across the United States. The Institute is making strides in treating pulmonary diseases, all in honor of Will Rogers' humanitarian spirit.

Will Rogers and Wally Post died in a plane crash on Point Barrow, Alaska, on August 15, 1935, at the age of 55.

A Local Connection:

The Dunn and McCarthy Shoe Company, owned and operate for generations by the Emerson Family, was the proud producer of Enna Jettick Shoes. Enna Jetticks were conceived of in 1926 by Fred L. Emerson. They were the fist shoes ever to be mass produced in standard widths and sizes.

In addition to revolutionizing the shoe industry, Emerson was a pioneer in marketing and advertising. In 1930, he contracted for the first nationwide radio hookup with 65 stations. It was here that Will Rogers got his first radio gig starring in Enna Jettick's Melodies.

Dunn & McCarthy operated in Auburn for more than a century, employing thousands of Auburnians, before closing in 1990. The success of Dunn & McCarthy and philanthropic spirit of long time president F.L. Emerson continue to shape the Auburn community today through former employees who are our friends and neighbors and the work of the Fred L. Emerson Foundation.

Other shows of this season:
Mary Poppins
Menopause - The Musical
Damn Yankees
The Will Rogers Follies
The Church Basement Ladies in the Last (Potluck) Supper

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Week Thirty-Seven - 15 To Go

Linda Fairstein’s telling of the history of New York City’s Grand Central Station should keep your reading interest perked. The mystery plot too is engaging.

Monday, September 1, 2014

Freda's Voice 100+ Book Challenge 2014

http://fredasvoice.blogspot.ca/2013/12/fredas-voice-100-book-challenge-2014.html

The Philosopher Stone Reading List
January 2014 Reviews

February 2014 Reviews

March 2014 Reviews  

April 2014 Review

May 2014 Review

June 2014 Review

July 2014 Review

August 2014 Review

September 2014 Review

 Be careful about reading health books.
You may die of a misprint.
 - Mark Twain